Academia and the infinite horizon

Last week I took part in a very interesting NERD Club (run by @EcoEvoTCD‘s @nhcooper123 – check out their marvellous blog for loads of useful information and perspectives on all things ecology and evolution) session on alternatives to academic careers. In a competitive field, making the choice between a traditional academic career and something that, well, isn’t that, is increasingly becoming a talking point among PhD students and early career researchers. The perceived process of getting a foothold in an academic career is frequently accompanied with expectations of long hours, continual transit between short-term contracts, and much heaping of responsibility – whether these perceptions are correct or not, the result is an increase in conversation about the alternatives.

As I fall into the ‘early career researcher’ box, I can’t really contribute much in the way of hindsight or perspective. However, there were two guests at NERD Club who could – they had both done PhDs and post-docs, and now had non-academic (but, crucially, not non-scientific or non-research) jobs outside of the university circuit. This first fact was interesting in itself, suggesting that, without actually trying a post-doc, it’s difficult to know if you’ll like it or not. If you’ve made the effort to get a PhD, it seems worth the further effort to try the academic route, to decide whether or not it’s for you, unless you’re completely certain that it isn’t for you. My own experience of a post-doc has been quite different to that of my PhD, in ways that I didn’t think it would be.

I got the impression that choosing a non-academic career involved a compromise between the ‘flexibility’ and ‘infinite horizons’ theoretically offered by academic posts, and something with more security, but less autonomy. This post isn’t intended to express a certain position on the issue – rather, I’d prefer it to prompt some discussion. Please do comment below if you’d like to. There were several other useful hints and pointers to come out of the meeting, which I’ll list below.

  • A ‘non-academic’ career doesn’t necessarily preclude ‘doing science’ – it could just mean that the pressure to publish is reduced. However, it might also mean that you have less freedom over the things that you do.
  • Consider approaching an organisation that isn’t a university. Kew Gardens, or the National Biodiversity Network, for example.
  • Do think about career alternatives – decide what you’d be trying to do if you weren’t considering an academic job, and start acquiring the skills that you’d need if you were to apply for a role in that field.
  • One particularly focused way of obtaining the skills you might need is to volunteer. Personally, I’m interested in science communication – I’ve managed to develop some of the relevant skills through maintaining this blog, along with others, maintaining social media profiles for the organisations that I’ve worked with, and maintaining websites. You may be able to pick up some of the skills you need in a way that enhances your current role.
  • The ScienceCareers Individual Development Plan site might be work a try.
  • There are some useful materials on Versatile PhD.
  • Dynamic Ecology has some interesting perspectives on the matter:

* It stands for ‘Networks in Ecology/Evolution Research Dynamic
Back to top

About these ads

About Mike

I'm a postdoctoral research fellow in the Botany Department at Trinity College Dublin, where my research focuses on estimating greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils at the national scale, using process-based models.
This entry was posted in Alternative, Postdoc, Useful links and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Academia and the infinite horizon

  1. Jacqui says:

    I think you’ve hit the nail on the head.

    Having newly transferred to the water & wastewater industry after 5 years of international, short contract post-docs I am enjoying the much more regular (& laidback, if fixed) hours. Plus job security & first decent salary! But I am definitely missing the independence, academic freedom and the wonderful research group dynamics I enjoyed as a young researcher. That youthful vibe of Masters, PhDs & post docs working together (well, sometimes) is actually a lovely thing in retrospect. I’m still learning new things all the rime – just from a different perspective. but I still feel like I’m in limbo in my brain about where I want to go and what I want to do in the long run!!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s